How to read and what to look for in Scam Emails:

Art Scam Emails

To See The Source Code: Open Email…Click on File…Click on Properties…Click on Details…Click on Message Source

First, look at the ‘Received: from’ lines. Usually, if there are nothing but a long list of numbers, that should be your first clue. You are also looking for servers that specialize in email spamming accounts. Most will have obvious addresses-like, bulkemail.webmail.servit.com or an obvious program name like Send It Out All Over Pro Ver. XX.X

Second, try to copy the IP address and see if it gets you anywhere…usually not, but it’s worth a try. They appear in the [ ] and look like this: 000.000.0.00 I must warn you here…most of these are set up on servers that rotate the IP’s just for this purpose. Paste the IP in the address bar of your Internet Explorer.

Third, try to do a search for the server/domain. Look at the LAST word before the .com Highlight the last word and .com/.net and do a search for that. ex… plasa.com

Forth, try to find the last step in the Whois database. Do a search for Whois. Then type in the .com name. You will need to be a detective here. Click on all the available links to search for information. If it is bogus, you will find ‘piggy-back’ server info with ranges like 000.000.0.000 – 000.000.0.999 If it is legit, you will find registrar information on the owner, admin and like, which you can then contact.

If this all stumps you, then you should go with the old saying, “If it sounds too good to be true…it usually is.” Also, keep in mind that these people do this for a living, believe it or not, so they are very crafty. Often times, they will only ask for a couple pieces of your work-so to, throw you off the track. If you can’t find bonified information about their company…don’t do it!

I hope this helps…bj